Annual Hoffman Lecture

Literature in Late Mono/lingualism

David Gramling, University of British Columbia, Vancover, Canada
Carson L01 *(subject to change)
5:00 pm.
Free and open to the public.

Over the past 25 years, literary studies at universities has been more than eager to seek and find multilingualism in the pages of novels. Knowing that code-mixing, translanguaging, multiple-language identities, and variations in linguistic style and accent are the true fabric of our social lives and meaning-making communities, we scholars, readers, and publishers quite naturally yearn to see these dimensions reflected in what we read. But: what if it's not so easy? What if historically nationalized linguistic-literary customs and standardized repertoires actively prohibit much of the worldly linguistic diversity we cherish from entering literary production in a consistent and adequate way? This talk explores this necessary and uncomfortable confrontation—and its implications for the overall endeavour of literary critique. 

"David Gramling is a writer and translator who teaches at the University of British Columbia on unceded Musqueam territory in Vancouver, Canada. He serves as Professor and Head of the Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies (@cenesubc) at UBC."