COLT MA Graduate Student Translates Le Carré and Ishiguro

Ukrainian Grad Student Translates Le Carré and Ishiguro

When Tetiana Savchynska began translating Kazuo Ishiguro’s latest novel, The Buried Giant, into her native Ukrainian, she had no inkling that the Japanese-born author, who writes in English, would win the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature.

“When I woke up to the announcement, I wondered if my life would change a little bit,” says the professional translator, Fulbright fellow, and graduate student in comparative literature, “because I was in the middle of proofreading my translation.”

Phone calls and emails did pour in, especially from Ukrainian journalists who had not yet read Ishiguro’s book. “They didn’t yet have a text to work with,” she says, “so they contacted me. But translators are used to feeling invisible. I am not used to that kind of attention.”

Mellon Mays Program at 25 years

At 25 Years, Mellon Mays Will See Record Eight Graduate

In the 25 years of the program at Dartmouth, one third of the 120 Mellon Mays alumni have enrolled in PhD programs, says Michelle Warren, a professor of comparative literature and Dartmouth coordinator of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship program.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation established the program in 1988 with eight founding institutions to increase faculty diversity. Dartmouth and fellow Ivies Harvard, Yale, and Princeton joined the following academic year, as did the UNCF consortium of historically black colleges and universities. The program has since grown to dozens of institutions across the country, and includes three universities in South Africa.

“Underrepresentation in higher education remains a significant issue,” says Warren.

For the full story please go to the Dartmouth Now.